Lorio Forensics

Lorio Forensics Welcomes Dr. Joette D. James

Dr. James is a nationally recognized clinical psychologist. She is an American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) Certified Clinical Neuropsychologist: only 1 percent of psychologists in the country attain this distinction. Dr. James is also the newest expert clinician to find a home at Lorio Forensics. Lorio Forensics is leading the way in reimagining mental health forensic consultation, with an approach that highlights only consultants with relevant clinical experiences, along with a culturally and structurally informed approach. Dr. James fits right in. 

Dr. Joette James is a native of Ontario, Canada. She earned her Bachelor of Arts with Honors and Distinction from the University of Western Ontario. Dr. James went on to complete a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern University and completed her postdoctoral internship at Harvard Medical School. She has extensive experience in pediatric and adult psychology, along with adult and pediatric neuropsychology. She has served at such prestigious institutions as Children’s National Medical Center in Washington and Children’s Hospital in Boston. Dr. James has served as an Assistant Professor at The George Washington University, in the departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences. 

Dr. James is an expert in her field and for several years has brought her insights to forensic mental health as both a testifying and a consulting expert in adolescent and adult cases. Lorio Forensics is now proud to welcome such an esteemed leader to our firm and with the addition of her extensive expertise, furthering our national reputation as a leader in the field of forensic mental health.

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